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Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

2 edition of Ultrasonic absorption and velocity in a weakly associated liquid, isobutyl bromide. found in the catalog.

Ultrasonic absorption and velocity in a weakly associated liquid, isobutyl bromide.

Arthur E. Clark

Ultrasonic absorption and velocity in a weakly associated liquid, isobutyl bromide.

by Arthur E. Clark

  • 1 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ultrasonic waves.,
  • Shear (Mechanics),
  • Bromides.

  • Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQC244 .C55
    The Physical Object
    Pagination58 p.
    Number of Pages58
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5817403M
    LC Control Number61002211
    OCLC/WorldCa12239498

    Ultrasonic velocity (U), viscosity (η), density (ρ) has been measured for ternary mixture of N-methylcyclohexylamine with 1-propanol using benzene as a solvent at three temperatures , and K, over the entire range of composition. the absorption of propagating ultrasonic wave rapidly goes down when the liquid medium (benzene, pyridine, furane, thiazole etc.) contains the other cyclic or heterocyclic liquids (toluene, picolines, lutidines etc.). First group of compounds has a great acoustical absorption and a long relaxation time.

      An ultrasonic technique, invariant to temperature changes, for a density measurement of different liquids under in situ extreme conditions is presented. The influence of geometry and material parameters of the measurement system (transducer, waveguide, matching layer) on measurement accuracy and reliability is analyzed theoretically along with experimental results. The plots of observed ultrasonic absorption versus solute conccntration'are shown in the Fig, 4 for all the seven carboxylic solutions studied, It can be seen from the Fig 4, that the observed ultrasonic absorption gen­ erally increases with the increase in solute concentration in DMSO, From Fig, S. it can be seen that the excess z Q,

      As another application of the results obtained the acoustic absorption of acetic and propionic acids is considered. A consistent interpretation of data in the literature is given on the assumption that the excess absorption is due to the perturbation of an equilibrium between monomeric and dimeric molecules. The mole fraction equilibrium constant K N, and the heat of reaction for the. A Pulse Method for the Measurement of Ultrasonic Absorption in Liquids: Results for Water J. M. M. PINKERTON 1 Nature volume , pages – () Cite this article.


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Ultrasonic absorption and velocity in a weakly associated liquid, isobutyl bromide by Arthur E. Clark Download PDF EPUB FB2

Ultrasonic measurements of the longitudinal absorption and velocity and shear impedance were made over a large range of temperatures in the weakly associated liquid isobutyl bromide.

Evidence was found for the coexistence of four different relaxation mechanisms. Above −50°C rotational isomeric relaxation exhibiting a single relaxation time was found. Vibrational relaxation also Cited by: adshelp[at] The ADS is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory under NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX16AC86AAuthor: Arthur E.

Clark. The author, the late A. Bhatia of the University of Alberta, Canada, begins with a fundamental discussion of the velocity and absorption of ultrasonic waves in relation to the temperature and pressure of the medium (e.g., gas, solid) on one hand, and the frequency of the waves on the other by: 3.

Weakly Associated Liquids The shear data on isobutyl bromide showed that even though the temperature dependence of the modulus is unusual (see Section I I I, C), a distribution of relaxations exists as in the strongly associated liquids.

A good fit to the data was obtained using the asymmetric Davidson and Cole function. by:   In the meantime, the variation of ultrasonic absorption coefficient in glycerol with temperature α g (T) is also measured.

For the sake of velocity determination in any sample at any temperature, an ultrasonic pulse is sent through the liquid in the tank, passing through the sample and is reflected back at the far side of the by: 6. Ultrasonicmeasurements of the longitudinal absorption and velocity and shear impedance were made over a large range of temperatures in the weakly associated liquid isobutyl bromide.

Ultrasonic absorption and velocity measurements have been made in pure liquid alkali metals at temperatures from their melting points to °C. Measured absorptions have been found to. Ultrasonic absorption and velocity measurements have been made in potassium–rubidium and sodium–cesium alloys at temperatures from 25 (or the liquidus points) to °C.

It has been found that the potassium–rubidium system behaves as an ideal liquid mixture. For both potassium–rubidium and sodium–cesium alloys, Rao's constant and Wada's constant calculated from measured velocity data. An ultrasonic velocity and absorption scanner has been designed to indicate a destabilization of colloidal systems, much earlier than possible by visual observation [, ].

The instrument is based on time-of-flight measurements, using a time counter to determine the delay time for pulses transmitted through the cell.

The absorption coefficient of ultrasonic frequencies 50 kHz, kHz, kHz, kHz and 1 MHz were calculated according to ISO [12]. Dependencies of the ultrasonic absorption coefficient versus temperature, humidity and pressure are shown in Fig 1.

Fig.1a shows the dependencies of absorption coefficient versus temperature, when the. Absorption and Dispersion of Ultrasonic Waves focuses on the influence of ultrasonics on molecular processes in liquids and gases, including hydrodynamics, energy exchange, and chemical reactions.

The book first offers information on the Stokes-Navier equations of hydrodynamics, as well as equations of motion, viscosity, formal introduction of. Ultrasonic Velocity and Absorption in Medicinal Oils.

biochemical modification such as oxidation or rearrangement of monoterpenes. The observed ultrasonic velocity of Eucalyptus which is the least of the six oils studied may be attributed to the low density of the oil i.e. (X10 3 Kgm-3). Variation of ultrasonic velocity with.

velocity in synovial liquid at room temperature before and after injection of % hyal uranidase was measured in order to improve the accuracy of joint disease diagnostics. The Stokes-Kirchhoff theory is used to study the ultrasound absorption coefficient in 33 liquid metals (25 metals are analyzed for the first time) at the melting temperature.

A relation between the absorption coefficient and the conduction electron concentration is found. The ratio of the absorption coefficient caused by heat conduction to the absorption coefficient caused by viscosity is.

Ultrasonic velocity and absorption measurements added to such a polar liquid, the ions of the dissociated electrolytes disturb the prevailing short range ordering among the water molecules.

bromide C51 and silver nitrate [el. The present ultrasonic velocity studies were. Ultrasonic Absorption in some Mixtures of an Unassociated and an Associated Liquid Sette, D. Abstract. THE difference between classical and experimental values of ultrasonic absorption coefficients in unassociated liquids has generally been ascribed to relaxation phenomena in energy distribution among the internal degrees of freedom of the.

Ultrasonic velocity and absorption on methylmetha acrylic resins C RAKKAPPAN, A SRINIVASA RAO and B KRISHNAN* Raman School of Physics, Pondicherry University, JIPMER campus, PondicherryMethylmethacrylate is a clear transparent liquid and is an excellent organic solvent.

UITRASONIC VELOCITY AD ABSORPTION IN LIQUID HELIUM By John R. Pellam and Abstract Measurements are given on the velocity and attenuation of ultrasonic energy in liquid helium at a frequency of 15 Mc/sec as a function of temperature from eK to K.

The velocity at 15 Mc/sec was found to agree with results obtained at Ultrasonic absorption in binary liquid mixtures containing benzene, chloroform, cyclohexane and toluene with triethylamine, a rotational isomeric relaxing liquid, as a common component has been studied at a frequency of MHz.

A pulse techrique has been used for the measurement of absorption with an accuracy of ±5%. Bauer-Sette formula has been used to calculate the absorption of these. material in/sec m/sec acrylic aluminum 17st aluminum aluminum brass brass (naval) brass (yellow) bronze, phosphor copper cu/ni 80/20 duplex hastaloy incoloy inconel.

ence liquid since its absorption coefficient and velocity of sound have already been determined accurately,28 The two compartments of a double chamber tank are separated by an acoustically transparent window and filled, respectively, with the reference liquid and the sample liquid.

One 3-in. diameter, MHz ceramic.Ultrasonic absorption coefficients (at about 8 Mc/sec) were determined by the pulse technique in glycols, cyclohexanol and m -cresol in dependence of the the ultrasonic velocity (at Mc/sec) in these liquids was determined by the ultrasonic interferometry.

The absorption decreased by a factor of 3 in this range and observed values were about twice those given by Stokes' formula. Values of (α/ν 2) at 25° c.

are x 10 sec 2 /cm. for water and x 10 sec 2 /cm. for ethyl alcohol.